filter: 💡 🐦 🏟 👽 📺 🐘💰

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How many jobs would we lose if we killed the auto industry down to its minimum viable size?

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Not haha. If anything I'd want to go back for an economics degree to disprove a bunch of half-baked theorems that have become capitalist dogma.

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I think your manager just isn't doing any work, tbh. They probably just surf reddit and buy crypto all day and occasionally pass an email with some actual work to their underlings.

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Here's a thought, what if we got rid of _all_ the bullshit managers above. Then you wouldn't need your "good guy" manager to play buffer (aka good cop) so you feel so enthusiastic to be slightly less exploited. Companies survive because the best employees manage up. We don't need top down hierarchy to get the job done. We need worker co-ops where the people who do the work manage the company.

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True, there were many problems in that period that Morrison is referring to.

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This is a good response and you're not wrong. But in my opinion, it should be $400 to everyone or $400 to not drive. Targeting it to drivers is still the wrong decision. There very well could be people on the bubble who see this subsidy, and keeping a car becomes the "smart" economic decision for them.

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When I was a young girl we were called citizens – American citizens. We were second-class citizens, but that was the word. In the 50s and 60s they started calling us consumers. So we did – consume. from r/Anticonsumption

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Definitely better to stay on the shelf vs landfill. But I'd argue that while it isn't zero sum, the book buying craze and the death of the library are far from unconnected. The process of "starve the beast" works like this: 1) a common civic space has avid supporters who contribute to its success partially because it's in their personal interest to keep it up. 2) a privatized solution (like buy every book you want for yourself) comes along and makes the common solution less important for those avid supporters. 3) the common space has fewer supporters who are concerned with it surviving, it becomes a budget burden and fewer people are there to complain when it's slowly dismantled. I think that's pretty close to describing the death of the city library IMHO.

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Reddit never did as far as I could see, but the group that I'm in has guidelines for what to do.

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A single book or a handful of books, sure. But we're talking about hoarding things and making collections in this post. Why keep these things to yourself? (Btw, this view isn't cold or utilitarian at all, it's actually super idealistic based on the idea that breaking the "ownership" mindset, and opting for communally shared things like libraries are better whenever it's possible.)