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> doesn't that mean that the worker is not receiving returns equal to the worth of their labour Not quite, because they may need the existence of a larger business to reach the level of productivity they have and the purpose of the co-op is to allow a group of people to receive more marginal return through cooperation than they get on their own. If they can earn an equal or greater amount on their own then presumably they wouldn't need to join the co-op in the first place. Also the most important part is not that there is a 1-to-1 mapping between exact value to company and compensation (because something as subjective as that isn't really possible), but that they share in the profits in a democratically determined manner while maintaining the ability to leave the co-op if they don't like the distribution.

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This is a good point that I hadn't thought about including because I was just compare and contrasting. But I'll be sure to bring up about the others in a future video.

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Ah good point. I'll make sure to add that in the follow-up.

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The goal is to draw in people who haven't ever considered that markets could exist outside of capitalism. I'm thinking about how to make more videos like this and would love feedback.

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I made a video trying to intro people to market socialism. What do you think? from r/Market_Socialism

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That 3000% number isn't in terms of real dollars (ie including effects of inflation). The 900% does normalize for inflation effects so you need to compare apples to apples as they did in this EPI article: > From 1978 to 2018, CEO compensation grew by 1,007.5% (940.3% under the options-realized measure), far outstripping S&P stock market growth (706.7%) and the wage growth of very high earners (339.2%). In contrast, wages for the typical worker grew by just 11.9%. From this perspective CEOs are clearly now taking a larger percentage of the pie than they should be. Citation: https://www.epi.org/publication/ceo-compensation-2018/

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This is actually not true. There have been a lot of really good workers who come from upbringings where they haven't learned their own worth. They get exploited for decades of their lives before they learn.

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Not directly but you could extrapolate that from the multitude of findings summarized within. Measuring causation (vs correlation) is hard and requires quite a bit of training and effort. It's actually harder than assuming the result and searching for a measurement that confirms your bias. It's why scientists train for such a long time to be able to remove as much bias from their measurements as they can.